Students

Jenny Chung
Department of Life Sciences Communication
jhchung1@wisc.edu

Jenny Chung is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Jenny’s research interests include nutrition, food consumption patterns, production technologies, and fast food with an emphasis on marketing, strategic communications and public perceptions of the food industry.  Her current project examines the marketability of nutrition information in fast food advertising.

 

Sarah Clifford
Department of Life Sciences Communication
School of Medicine & Public Health
seclifford@wisc.edu

Sarah Clifford is a Master’s student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication and the School of Medicine & Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Sarah’s primary research interests focus on public health and risk communication. Specifically, she is interested in studying public opinion as it relates to emerging health crises, infectious disease, and biotechnologies.

 

Pat DeFlorin
Department of Life Sciences Communication
deflorin@wisc.edu

Pat DeFlorin is a Master’s student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is interested in distilling and communicating complex science topics so that they resonate with lay audiences.

 

April Eichmeier
Department of Life Sciences Communication
aaeichmeier@wisc.edu

April is a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on how science communication impacts beliefs and decision-making, both of which can have political implications.

 

Keith Franke
Department of Genetics
Department of Life Sciences Communication
kfranke@wisc.edu

Keith Franke is an undergraduate student in both the Department of Genetics and the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Keith’s research involves the intersection of genetic technology with public opinion, with specific interest in how emerging genetic techniques will be implemented into everyday life in the near future. 

 

Emily Howell
Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies
elhowell@wisc.edu

Emily Howell is a doctoral student in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Emily is in the Energy Analysis and Policy graduate certificate program and interested in how science communication can facilitate greater citizen involvement in energy policy-making and create more effective policy. Her research looks at the public perception of the risk and benefits associated with hydraulic fracturing in the U.S. and what political, knowledge-based, and trust factors play into those perceptions.

 

Patrice Kohl
Department of Life Sciences Communication
pakohl@wisc.edu

Patrice Kohl is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Novel Ecosystems National Science Foundation (NSF) Integrated Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) fellow. Patrice’s research interests focus on science communication, environmental issues and emerging technologies. Her current work explores communication and socio-ethical implications of using genomic tools to transform, eliminate or recreate populations of wildlife to address conservation challenges.

 

Nicole Krause
Department of Life Sciences Communication
nmkrause@wisc.edu

Nicole Krause is a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Nicole is interested in science, risk, and political communication, with a particular interest in controversial issues and the politicization of science. She is also interested in public perceptions of risks facing the Great Lakes, especially among Wisconsin residents.

 

Julian Mueller-Herbst
Department of Communication Arts
muellerherbs@wisc.edu

Julian Mueller-Herbst is a graduate student in Communication Science with the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is interested in how news media communication and social media influence political processes and their public perception in a global and cross-national context, specifically Germany and the US. Currently he is looking at the discussion of scientific and political issues in German and American news outlets.

 

Anne Nardi
Department of Life Sciences Communication
anardi@wisc.edu

Anne Nardi is a master’s student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Anne’s interest include local and organic food communications and how social norms influence environmental behavior change.

 

Tomoko Okada
Department of Life Sciences Communication
okada2@wisc.edu

Tomoko Okada is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Tomoko’s research interests focus on science and risk communication, and public opinion. She is particularly interested in studying how media influence public understanding and the process underlying opinion formation in scientific issues.

 

Kathleen Rose
Department of Life Sciences Communication
kmrose@wisc.edu

Kate Rose is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Kate is interested in science and risk communication. In particular, her research focuses on public understanding and engagement with respect to controversial science and environmental issues, and the public and scientific discourse surrounding those issues.

 

Catherine Turng
Department of Life Sciences Communication
turng@wisc.edu

Catherine Turng is a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests lie in examining how media—particularly new technologies, like video games—may shape the public’s perceptions and knowledge around science.

 

Christopher Wirz
Department of Life Sciences Communication
cwirz@wisc.edu

Christopher Wirz is a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Chris is interested in the public opinion, (social) media discourse, and networks involved in the communication of science, health, and risk-related topics, especially as the issues become controversial and politicized. He is also interested in applying modern methods and computational tools to analyze how people get information and make decisions in evolving communication landscapes.

 

Shiyu Yang
Department of Life Sciences Communication
syang364@wisc.edu

Shiyu Yang is a doctoral student in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-MadisonShiyu‘s research interests center on risk and science communication. Specifically, she is interested in studying how people use information to make judgments about various health, environmental, and technological risks, and the underlying cognitive and affective processes that shape individuals’ risk perception and risk-related decision-making and behaviors.